SpatiaLite for Android Available

On what seems to be turning into SpatiaLite Monday, Sandro Furieri also announced on the SpatiaLite Google Group the availability of a stable version of SpatiaLite for Android.

I am happy to see that this version was developed and contributed back by the US Army Geospatial Center. The fact that they contributed back to the project under a standard open-source license is a nice step from a DoD organization.

The message is quoted below:

Hi List,

I’m really proud to announce you all that finally a rock solid stable and really easy-to-be-deployed binary porting of SpatiaLite for the Android platform is now available for download [1].

[1] https://www.gaia-gis.it/fossil/libspatialite/wiki?name=splite-android

Many thanks to the U.S. Army Geospatial Center [2] who very generously contributed this highly appreciated and really useful resource under a genuine free software license (LGPLv3).

[2] http://www.agc.army.mil/

A detailed tutorial [3] explaining how-to deploy and use SpatiaLite on Android platforms has been kindly contributed by Andrea Antonello, who spent many long hours during the last week while performing a thorough testing of SpatiaLite-Android, then deciding to publicly share his experiences with the SpatiaLite community. Feel absolutely free to pay a beer to Andrea; he’ll surely appreciate 😉

[3] https://www.gaia-gis.it/fossil/libspatialite/wiki?name=spatialite-android-tutorial

enjoy, Sandro

SpatiaLite 4.0 Released

It looks like it was a busy weekend for Sandro Furieri and the rest of the SpatiaLite team as version 4.0 was announced on Sunday. There are a number of changes, so it’s best to catch up on them before switching over.

Not this SpatiaLite

I have a couple of Federal customers that are integrating SpatiaLite into their workflows so I’ll need to take a day or so to assess impacts any impacts there. Looks like the perfect way to slide back into work after a long weekend.

Personal Geospatial Workflows

I’ve had a couple of people ask me recently about the geospatial tools I use. Year-over-year, that answer changes but here’s how I answer that right now:

As a Federal contractor, I spend a lot of time working with the Esri stack during my work day. A few years ago, I added a few open-source geospatial tools into my tool set and, since then, have also done a respectable amount to consulting work them as well. The balance between the two varies over time, depending on the requirements of individual customers and projects. Lately, commercial customers have seemed much more interested in open-source tools while my government customers are sticking with Esri. Since those observations are based on the the extremely heavy filter of my own recent experience, I’d be hesitant to draw any larger conclusions from them.

I’ve always believed that proficiency with a wide range of tools makes me a better consultant and integrator, so I am always exploring and trying new things. With those commercial customers, and in my own personal side projects, my recent workflows have gelled around a core set of tools, both commercial and open-source: Continue reading “Personal Geospatial Workflows”

Wilson Center to Discuss FCC National Broadband Map

One of the most compelling recent success stories for open-source geospatial tools in the Federal Government has been the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) National Broadband Map initiative. It has been a very visible example of the stability, scalability, flexibility, and power of open-source geospatial tools.

The Woodrow Wilson Center will be hosting a case study of National Broadband Map on October 15th, 2012. The event’s page also includes a link to the full paper (PDF), authored by Zachary Bastian of the Wilson Center and Michael Byrne of the FCC.

The full paper, in my opinion, is recommended reading for anyone working with geospatial technologies in the government space. While the Broadband Map has rightfully garnered significant attention based upon its success, especially in terms of performance and scalability, the paper does a good job of reminding us that the map is not an end goal in itself, but a step toward the larger policy goal of expanding broadband access. The paper does an excellent job of illustrating how top-level policy goals were broken down into actionable parts that resulted in a concrete product such as the Broadband Map. In so doing, it walks us through the introduction and fostering of an open culture within the FCC that resulted not only in the Broadband Map but also in the development of open APIs and the availability of FCC tools as open-source projects themselves.

In its conclusions, the paper also makes compelling observations about the power of focused policy goals to drive the use of technology standing in stark contrast to generic overarching technical policies, such as the National Spatial Data Infrastructure (NSDI) which are disconnected from specific policy goals and achieve little traction.

If you are interested not only in geospatial technologies, but also the link between policy and technology implementation, and the cultural change that can be brought about by open-source technologies, you should consider attending the event at the Wilson Center on the 15th. While not a universal blueprint, the National Broadband Map makes a compelling case study.

ToGeoJson and ToWKT for the Esri FGDB API

In support of some of our ongoing PIM work, we’ve been integrating the Esri File Geodatabase (FGDB) API into some tools. Without going into a level of detail that would hijack this post, one of the many functions performed by some of the tools is to validate physical spatial databases against established data models to analyze compliance and identify differences. These databases may be in Esri or non-Esri formats and we have traditionally handled Esri geodatabases through ArcObjects since it provides a relatively uniform interface across the various flavors of geodatabase.

Of course, ArcObjects requires an ArcGIS license of some sort and we are finding out that this is not always available to users in the field under many situations so the FGDB API gets past that for file geodatabases, at least. Continue reading “ToGeoJson and ToWKT for the Esri FGDB API”

Favorite QGIS Resources of the Moment

I’ve been dabbling more with Quantum GIS (QGIS) lately. I’m not doing anything particularly sophisticated but it’s a great viewer for some data types (SpatiaLite, GeoJSON) that aren’t supported by my commercial desktop GIS so it’s helping me validate outputs of some applications I’m writing.

While I’ll never be a real cartographer, I am interested in doing a little more. Here are the resources that have been helping me the most lately…
Continue reading “Favorite QGIS Resources of the Moment”

CartoDB/Leaflet Sample Update

A while back, I posted about some experimentation I did with Leaflet and CartoDB in the wake of FOSS4G in Denver. I recently had the chance to go back and update that sample with some spatial queries. At the time of the original post, CartoDB was still in beta and spatial queries didn’t seem to work, despite the fact that the back-end was driven by PostGIS.

Continue reading “CartoDB/Leaflet Sample Update”