Open-Source GIS Bootcamp at Salisbury University

Thanks to LinkedIn, I saw that Dr. Art Lembo of Salisbury (Maryland) University is leading an “Open Source/Enterprise GIS Summer Bootcamp” at the university from June 3 – 7, 2013. All of the salient details, including contact information, can be found here (PDF).

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SharpMap 1.0 RC1 Released

Over on Google+, Diego Guidi let me know that the SharpMap 1.0 Release Candidate has been released. There was a time when I worked with, and wrote about, SharpMap a lot. During that entire time, the stable version of SharpMap sat at some version number that started with “0.9”. The release of a 1.0 candidate is a signal that the project is moving forward.

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Early Bird Registration for FOSS4G-NA Closes Soon

David Bitner sent out a reminder that Early Bird reagistration for the FOSS4G North Americaconference closes on 1 April 2013. After that, the price goes up by $50 US. You can register online at EventBrite.

The preliminary program (PDF) for this year’s event looks exceptional, building upon and potentially exceeding the outstanding quality of FOSS4G-NA 2012. I’ll be sorry to miss the conference this year but will be looking forward to its social media exhaust.

Image by s shepherd schizoform on flickr CC-BY-2.0, via Wikimedia Commons

The Best Thing I Saw at TUGIS 2013

I spent the day yesterday at Towson University attending the TUGIS 2013 conference. The new one-day format was a firehose that showcased the diversity of geospatial work occurring across the State of Maryland. The keynote by Learon Dalby was well-received and the content of the conference was generally substantive. While the day was a sprint, there was one workshop that really caught my attention more so than I would have thought from its title.

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Off to TUGIS

Tomorrow, I’ll be heading up to the Towson University GIS (TUGIS) conference with 500 or so of my closest Maryland geo-friends. It has been restructured into a one-day event and the program seems to be very content-rich as a result. I am particularly happy to see more open-source content this year. There’s an intro session featuring PostgreSQL, PostGIS, QGIS, and GeoServerpresented by Salisbury State University. Salisbury was once known as a bastion of Manifold so they’ve got a long history of thinking outside the Arc. Additionally, there is a session (by Towson University) discussing the use of GDAL, OGR, and Shapely in the development of a spatial service.

Brian Timoney's favorite state flag

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Checking Out the GDAL/OGR Plugin for ArcGIS

A while back, I blogged the availability of a GDAL/OGR plug-in for ArcGIS desktop by Ragi Burhum at AmigoCloud. At the time, I was hoping to dig into it fairly quickly but that didn’t happen and I’m finally getting to it. Anyone who has followed this blog for a while knows that I have had more than a passing interest in integrating new data sources with ArcGIS over the years. This comes from the fact that, as a technology geek, I am fascinated by all forms of technology and enjoy the process of integration and, as a consultant providing services to the Federal Government, most of my customers have standardized on Esri tools. Integrations such as GeoRSS, PostGIS, GeoCommons and GeoJSON have directly benefitted my customers for real-world applications so I continue look for ways to remove the barriers between them and the data they seek.

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SpatiaLite 4.1.0 Beta Preview Available

On the SpatiaLite Google Group this morning, Sandro Furieri announced the availability of a beta preview of SpatiaLite 4.1.0. The primary focus of this preview is to get early comment on new capabilities supporting the storage, validation, and query of XML documents.

More information about this update can be found here. Says Sandro:

The main goals of these recently introduced enhancements are:
– storing XML Documents directly within the DBMS
– supporting XML validation
– supporting plain SQL queries on behalf of XML Documents
via canonical XPath expressions

Implementing directly into the Spatial DBMS a common core of XML-oriented features surely is an interesting and useful option, just considering that ISO- and INSPIRE-Metadata or SLD/SE Styles are fully based on XML.

Although I find myself working more with GeoJSON and CartoCSS these days, I think support for XML is a good step for SpatiaLite. There are some very mature use cases based on XML, as Sandro points out. While SLD is not my favorite, this may keep it on my radar. Also, it would be interesting to see how this new capability would possibly affect the evolution of the OGC GeoPackage draft specification.