f=geojson, Part 3

So it seems this thing may be snowballing. The idea of GeoJSON support was originally floated (not by me) on Esri’s ideas.arcgis.com site a few years back. The entry can be found here.

A few days after Esri announced support for GeoJSON in AGOL, they updated the above entry as follows:

Note from Esri (Dec 16, 2014): We are considering this feature to be included in the next minor release after ArcGIS 10.3.

So, it appears ArcGIS Server users have something to look forward to after the 10.3 rollout. It would seem to me that, after implementing all of this back-end support, the next logical step would be to add consumption support in the web and (preferably) desktop clients. (Note: That is purely speculation on my part.)

BTW, the language in the note above is still a little ambiguous so now may be a good time to log in and upvote this idea if you haven’t already done so.

It’s great to see my favorite data format making inroads into the vast Esri user community. Perhaps all the tools I use will finally be interoperable in a modern, web-friendly way.

f=geojson, Part 2

In which I say nice things about Esri. You have been warned…

A couple of weeks ago, I gave a talk at a local Esri GeoDev Meetup (which also served as a convenient way to tell a room full of developers that my company is hiring developers) on a GeoJSON server object extension for ArcGIS Server that I open-sourced some time ago. I started that effort a little while after giving another talk in which I called on Esri to start supporting GeoJSON. I’m not one to wait around so I built an approach myself.

At the most recent meetup, the Esri staff who were there updated the group on upcoming efforts with regard to GeoJSON. Honestly, I’ve known for some time that there are a lot of people inside Esri who “get it” and that various things have been percolating with regard to GeoJSON.

So I was happy to see the official announcement of support for GeoJSON in ArcGIS Online (AGOL) feature services. Included in the support is access through the REST API using an “f=geojson” parameter. This makes it much easier to consume AGOL services in the web client of your choice. (The announcement shows a Leaflet example.)

Continue reading “f=geojson, Part 2”

Building a Simple Geodata Service With Node, PostGIS, and Amazon RDS

tl;dr

This post describes the construction of a simple, lightweight geospatial data service using Node.JS, PostGIS and Amazon RDS. It is somewhat lengthy and includes a number of code snippets. The post is primarily targeted at users who may be interested in alternative strategies for publishing geospatial data but may not be familiar with the tools discussed here. This effort is ongoing and follow-up posts can be expected.

Continue reading “Building a Simple Geodata Service With Node, PostGIS, and Amazon RDS”

WeoGeo: Now With GeoJSON

It’s great news that the government shutdown is finally over. Many of our colleagues across the geospatial industry can now report back to work, ending a another stressful period for them. During the shutdown, many stepped up to try and fill the gap left by shuttered government web sites that would normally distribute geospatial data.

Continue reading “WeoGeo: Now With GeoJSON”

GeoJSON on GitHub: Now What?

So GitHub announced that you can now automatically view any GeoJSON files that may be in a repository inside an interactive map driven by MapBox technology. This simple enhancement to GitHub is probably one of the most significant developments in the geospatial industry in years. I’ll explain a little later in this post. It’s also important to view this new capability as a great, but limited, first step. I’ll discuss that a little later as well.

While it’s cool to click on a link and just see a map, it doesn’t take long to wonder about how you can use this capability beyond viewing data in GitHub. What follows are three ways to capitalize on GeoJSON in GitHub. Not all are directly related to the new mapping capability, and two have been possible for a long time. That said, the GitHub announcement may draw interest from users who have not previously considered either GitHub or GeoJSON, so I hope these approaches will be useful.
Continue reading “GeoJSON on GitHub: Now What?”

GeoJSON From ArcGIS Server

A while back, I posted about my desire to see GeoJSON supported as an output format from ArcGIS Server. I found myself needing that capability so I recently completed, and posted to GitHub, a first cut at a server object extension (SOE) for ArcGIS Server 10.1 that enables output of GeoJSON via an HTTP GET.

Using the SOE is fairly straightforward. If you download the code and build it (ensuring you have installed the ArcObjects SDK for .Net), you can simply move the project outputs to your target machine and use the ArcGIS Server manager to install the SOE. Once you log into the manager application, click “Site” at the top of the page and then “Extensions” on the left. Click “Add Extension” and browse to the .soe file. You should end up seeing something like this:

Continue reading “GeoJSON From ArcGIS Server”

OGC Abandons the Web

Those are my words, not theirs.

It came to light today that OGC has decided to withdraw the GeoServices REST Specification, also known as the “ESRI REST API,” as a proposed standard. I will not take up the relative merits of the specification or the implications of OGC potentially adopting an industry-developed specification that has so much implied workflow embedded in it. With this decision, three facts remain unaltered:

  1. The ESRI REST API will continue forward as a widely-used de facto standard in the form of ArcGIS Server installs and other emulations, such as that in Arc2Earth.
  2. GeoJSON will continue forward as a widely-used de facto standard in the form of numerous open-source implementations.
  3. OGC still has no JSON syntax.

Yes, twelve years after the birth of JSON, five years after the release of the ESRI REST API and its embedded JSON syntax, and five years after the release of GeoJSON 1.0, OGC is still has no entry in the JSON space. Between Esri and GeoJSON, the utility of JSON in web mapping applications has been roundly proven. In the ESRI arena, find me anyone who willingly uses the SOAP API these days while the adoption of support for GeoJSON across the open-source GIS world speaks volumes. The industry has voted with its feet and its code as to what it prefers.

Continue reading “OGC Abandons the Web”